Cantorate

Yeruham Blindman

Cantor & composer

Yeruham Blindman served as a cantor in Kishnev, Tarnopol and Berdichev. By 1834 he was touring extensively as a cantor for Synagogues throughout Poland and the Ukraine. He became known as “Yeruham Hakatan” (the little one) because of his small stature. Blindman was admired for his tenor voice with unlimited falsetto range and his improvisatory vocal style. Although he only had a basic musical education, he composed many arrangements for liturgical music using melodies from Jewish folk songs.

1798-1891

Samuel Vigoda

Cantor

Born in Dobrzyń, Poland. Studied with his father and later with Yossele Rosenblatt. Vigoda officiated as cantor in Budapest, and in 1933 immigrated to the US, where he continued in cantorial offices in New York (taking Rosenblatt's position at the Oheb Zedek synagogue) and in Washington. He is one of the star cantors of the cantors' "golden age."

1895-1990

Moshe Taube

Cantor

Born in Cracow, Poland. After the holocaust, he immigrated to Palestine, where he worked as a cantor in Tel- Aviv. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1957, and officiated as cantor in New York and later in Pittsburg. Taube developed a unique style as a cantor and composed original melodies for prayers.

Sources: Encyclopedia Judaica, FAU Libraries website. Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh. 

1927-

Joseph Singer

Cantor

Born in Hilnik, Hungary, officiated as cantor in Beuthen, Nurnberg and Vienna (where he succeeded Salomon Sulzer). He published numerous studies on Jewish music and was among the first to investigate prayer chants scientifically, in an attempt to systemize the traditional prayer modes.

1841-1911

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