Field work

Cute Boy, Charming Girl: Children's Songs of the Modern Hebrew Nation (1882-1948)

Researcher

Cute Boy, Charming Girl: Children’s Songs of the Modern Hebrew Nation(1882-1948) presents Hebrew songs written for and sung by Jewish children in pre-state Israel. The selection represents highlights in the development of this genre in the first half of the twentieth century. It includes poems by canonical poets that were set to music by professional composers, songs by amateur poets and composers, translated songs, and borrowed melodies.

Material Type: 
Recordings
Year: 
2013

The Hasidic Niggun as Sung by the Hasidim

Editor

Contains Niggunim of various genres, and from various Hassidic dynasties, performed either in solo or group singing (choir or congregation), occasionally with instrumental accompaniment. The Niggunim are taken from a variety of calendar and life-cycle events: Shabbat, Festivals, Zemirot, Tish, Wedding, Dance, Devequt, Marches, Waltzes, etc.
Most of the tracks were recorded in Jerusalem and Benei Berak, others in Kefar Habbad, Rehovot, and one in the US.

Material Type: 
Recordings
Year: 
2004

Invention individuelle et tradition collective dans la musique juive de Hongrie

Also in: Musicological Studies 3 (1980): 139-58. Interviews made during field work in Hungary and Czechoslovakia illustrate the emic concepts about musical composition in Ashkenazic Jewish music. The concepts differ considerably with regard to various styles within the tradition. Nevertheless, it is generally agreed that Hassidic nigumim are original inventions of composers from Hassidic courts.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
1982-83

Hebraeisch-orientalischer Melodienschatz, 09[G]: Der Volksgesang der osteuropaeischen Juden


Click Here for Slide Show


This entry is part of an online exhibit entitled: "Hava Nagila: From Idelsohn to Belafonte & Beyond," prepared by Eva Heinstein with help from the JMRC staff. To view the exhibit in its entirety click on the link above.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
1932

Just harmonizing in their own way': Change and reaction in Judeo-Spanish song.

The transplantation of traditional Sephardic songs to other contexts involves the potential for variations in performance that are eventually assimilated into the repertoire. The cultural profile of performers is crucial for an understanding of the nature of these changes and their acceptance in the tradition.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1993

The Performance of the Judeo-Spanish Repertoire

The Present study deals with (i) the performance of the Judeo-Spanish repertoire maintained until today by the Sephardi Jews from two main areas of their Diaspora - the eastern Mediterranean (the Ottoman area, later Turkey, Bulgaria, Greece, and Yugoslavia), and the western Mediterranean (Morocco), (ii) the performance of the secular and paraliturgical Sephardi repertoire sung in Judeo-Spanish.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1997

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