Liturgy

The mystical strain in Jewish liturgical music

Drawing on evidence from the Ashkenazic, Sephardic, and Yemenite traditions, and generally relying on 19th and 20th-c. notation, the author considers the identifiable contributions of mystics and elements that actually grew out of mystical theory. Both the logogenic style (the Rabbinic, intellectual, and didactic strain) and the pathogenic style (the mystical strain) are present in the music of the Jewish liturgy. Cited texts include those by a 7th-c.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1983

Medieval Elements in the Liturgical Music of the Jews of Southern France and Northern Spain

Refutes the theory held by Idelsohn and others that Sephardic music reflected solely Arabic influence, and posits that, from the mid-12th c. to the end of the 15th c., the center of gravity of Iberian Jewish culture moved northward to Christian Spain and Provence. The burgeoning musical culture of that region must have affected the music of the Jews there, just as the synagogue song of the German Jews was influenced by the secular song and Christian chant of northern Europe.

Material Type: 
Articles in Journals
Year: 
1975-6

More Precious Than Pearls: Shbahoth - Songs of Praise in the Jewish-Babylonian tradition for General Use, Sabbaths, Festivals and Life Cycle Events

A compilation of 31 Jewish-Babylonian songs, including Hebrew texts, English translations and transliterations. 17 songs are also performed by the author (voice), Ehsan Alemam ('ud) and Waleed (tar, daff) and appear on the accompanying CD. Includes historical, social and musical background.

Material Type: 
Books
Year: 
2004

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